Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

1 MC wrote:
caustic resin wrote:

Turning a nifty fifty years old today.

Happy birthday Caustic!!

Belated b-day wishes!

- Nathan

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

Heyo heading to Washington DC in a couple of weeks, any recommendations, especially places off the radar?

Visited a couple of times about 10 years ago, plan to visit some of the usual monuments, air and space museum, natural history museum. We are taking my stepson, but will likely venture out on our own in the evening when he's complaining about being tired. We're staying at the Wharf

politic ditto

53

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

hopefully eddie sees that, as i'm unfortunately not up on current dc stuff.  i'm so far out in the boonies at this point that i've almost caught myself referring to frederick as "the city"

the boy your mother wanted you to meet

54 (edited by Gloves 2018-06-06 12:07:55)

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

bob wrote:

hopefully eddie sees that, as i'm unfortunately not up on current dc stuff.  i'm so far out in the boonies at this point that i've almost caught myself referring to frederick as "the city"

What's the Maryland suburbs of DC like?

Also, there's probably some spells or incantations that will summon eddie back to the jicksboard

politic ditto

55 (edited by jickjoosment 2018-06-06 13:58:59)

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

this is a lovely thread!
hello to all
happy jicks touring

56 (edited by kate h 2018-06-07 06:11:02)

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

Gloves wrote:

Heyo heading to Washington DC in a couple of weeks, any recommendations, especially places off the radar?

Visited a couple of times about 10 years ago, plan to visit some of the usual monuments, air and space museum, natural history museum. We are taking my stepson, but will likely venture out on our own in the evening when he's complaining about being tired. We're staying at the Wharf.

Also, there's probably some spells or incantations that will summon eddie back to the jicksboard

I'm chiming in because I'm going on a trip to DC starting this Saturday for four days and so I've been on an Internet binge of DC stuffs to pack my itinerary. So if it interests you:

The Smithsonian's new(ish) National Museum of African American History & Culture is supposed to be a rad must-see. Trouble is, tix are hard to get: https://nmaahc.si.edu/visit/passes. I'm desperately hoping to get one of the same-day walk up passes if I can. There's a bunch of great exhibitions on but I really want to see the music one: https://nmaahc.si.edu/musical-crossroads and continue my not altogether insignificant slavery studies with seeing this: https://nmaahc.si.edu/slavery-and-freedom

Then because I'm really into the Civil War I want to hit the Hirshhorn to see Pickett's Charge by Mark Bradford. I've seen the original at Gettysburg so I'm so so psyched to see this one: https://hirshhorn.si.edu/exhibitions/ma … ts-charge/
It doesn't hurt that everything else at the Hirshhorn right now looks kick ass — the media show, the absence one, I'm stoked.

Then I'm going to geek out seeing Lincoln's Cottage, Ford's Theater, and the Frederick Douglass House. And I'm a total sucker for the National Gallery. If I lived in DC I swear I'd go there once a week at least!

One final tip not from a DC denizen but I was raised in the area and go there pretty frequently — go early or go late to the museums. They get SO packed. I recall taking my daughter to the Natural History Museum a coupla years ago and it's nearly impossible to see things the crowds are so thick. If you're there longer than Sunday of the Jicks show on the 17th, hit some of your National Mall faves on Monday or Tuesday at opening or at the last 1-2 hours of the day.

Have fun!

As for summoning Eduardo, you face East, blink your eyes three times and say, "The Niceman Commeth — Eduardo..." again, three times. That oughta do the trick.

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

You can probably get his attention on Twitter, something from him usually pops up in my timeline from day to day.

- Nathan

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

kate h wrote:

If you're there longer than Sunday of the Jicks show on the 17th, hit some of your National Mall faves on Monday or Tuesday at opening or at the last 1-2 hours of the day.

Have fun!

As for summoning Eduardo, you face East, blink your eyes three times and say, "The Niceman Commeth — Eduardo..." again, three times. That oughta do the trick.

Thanks for the tips, Kate! We are now scheming on early and late museums visits. Sadly I will be arriving in DC a few days after the Jicks.

While I believe that is one possible way to summon the elusive beast, I have it on good authority that if you say "Eddie Refresh" three times into an eastern wind he will appear during the next new moon.

nguideau, I am not social media friends with any jicksters but I do have a neglected twitter account.

politic ditto

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

gloves, is this still a thing? happy to help. ednoons - at - gmail

We need the birds.
I understand, but the files are organized alphabetically.

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

usernamechris wrote:

They had a documentary about the current fantanyl and heroin crisis in the USA, where thousands of people have overdosed and more are expected to die.

Interesting, sad stuff. In my day we all read Go Ask Alice and were all scared straight away from heroin. In spite of the book later getting a deeper critique it is effective for teens to deter THAT kind of utterly crippling drug use so what's the biggie? I mean it worked for me.

As far as all the opioid prescription type drugs go, it is so sad and involves so many people, not just the poor, but I'd swear when I went to my friend's place for July 4th that both of the very wealthy career-driven men in the room were totally doped up. Very sad business. Personally I don't take any prescription drugs of any kind so I'm feeling lucky...for now.

usernamechris wrote:

A new book came out here recently, "Addicted?", by Matt Noffs and Kieran Palmer, who say that there is a difference between someone who is addicted, for example to the internet or alcohol or coffe and uses that, and someone who is dependent and needs to resolve to crime and is drawn into severe difficulties in order to feel okay. They say that most everyone is addicted in some way, though many have learned to stay off certain stimulants, or they control their use in a manageable way, or they are in a more extensive trouble, and they say that there is often some kind of trauma in an addicted person's story, one they tried to dull with a stimulant.

It could definitely be argued that alcohol is an equally deeply troubling drug.

And Internet addiction of sorts is weird. The entire paradigm upon which the fossil fuel age and its trajectory into the info age rests is such a pronounced anomaly versus all other human history. We're really like little mice in a very vast experiment that begins with pervasive electricity and has brought us to near-continuous instantaneity of information attraction and exchange.

I, for one, believe firmly that it wont last precisely because it is an anomaly and also because of the reasons elucidated in the book The Limits to Growth, which while not dead on in its predictions (because of things like false pricing, financial chicanery of all sorts, an an abdication of responsibility in resource management grounded in reality) still will rest on, well, essentially the materialist theory of history. That will get us back to having to deal with the reality of materiality, like it or not. (Which isn't a case against more psychic and spiritual evolution, it just is a a resource picture).

usernamechris wrote:

So while watching that documentary I had to think, that are currently a lot of people who are not okay enough in their life to mange without a stimulant, or who were willing to risk getting them self addicted to an often lethal substance, which suggests that they were not in a very good place in life when they took that risk.

The authors suggest that there are ways to manage addictions, and that people often recognise their trauma in that process and then learn another way to respond to that trauma. From memory they call it healing and it appears to be some type of reorientation in relation to one's position in life, where people learn to treat themselves well and develop strengths and can manage without stimulants.

And shouldn't it maybe also be "manage without depressants?" Because alcohol, heroin, morphine, vicodin, codeine, fentanyl, oxycontin, valium, xanax, and the barbitols are depressants, not stimulants. Meth and caffeine, nicotine, ecstasy etc. are stimulants.

usernamechris wrote:

Anyway, remember the Big Depression and that clever strategy someone organised then in order to give people a wage? Well, if for some reason people don't feel like they have to invest quite as much tax money into the military sector anymore, maybe they could use that money instead to fund a large scale rehabilitation program for all those people who were at some point driven out of a manageable lifestyle.

Just from watching those screens here it looks like there are all these places in the US where there is a need for community development, you know, where there are empty buildings and conflict between various social environments. If that is where that tax money went, then that would produce jobs, drive the economy, give people an income, a sense of purpose and a way for people to learn about unhealthy realationships, to reach for alternatives and to organise some form of personal development, maybe not so much in an gains growth oriented direction, but in a communal and service oriented direction.

I don't know, from here it looks like there are currently huge numbers of war traumatised people in need of a normal life in the East, in Europe and in Africa, and large numbers of financially compromised people in the West.

It is in many ways a rotten place where we look at a screen and see all these people in catastrophic circumstances, and all we do is act locally, most people I know anyway, exercise influence there and act in a socially inclusive manner where it is easy to do.

I think about this a lot which is why I responded to your post.

I actually try now to not consume so much news. Again, we live in an anomalous time and even though in the past like from the 1700s forwards there was regular-ish news of far off traumas (war, starvation, pestilence, etc.) it wasn't every day all day endlessly.

There is a scale of coping that it is my intuition that everyone faces, but many will argue not so, that they get off on an endless onslaught of info and this is the beaut of a hyper-connected world.

I, for one, do not. I've been in the news business, and in the digital news business in the past, and the scale has only increased since then with mobile phones.

Truthfully I am overwhelmed by world news mainly because I feel helpless in the face of it. And then this truly awful Trump era with its reality TV ethos and its utter elimination of any shred of human dignity, it's a LOT for people of humanity and sensitivity to witness. This being distinct from simply disagreeing with a policy, party, or position — what I am pointing to is different, it is the manner of engagement, a manner of engagement so degraded that it's not the same ballgame at all anymore. At all.

But besides that, one thing I think about relative to all these washed up towns and depressed (white) folks, mainly, and depressed both economically and in terms of perceived opportunity, or lack of opportunity, is that, again, due to the anomaly of our time, has totally obliterated "traditional" manufacturing and production so that if there are any jobs left, they are also of a degraded sort, the kind that unfortunately so many of the world's population engages in, mindless mass production.

Our outsized, unsustainable, and ultimately unsatisfactory scale of consumption compels these degraded jobs (jobs which we illusorily imagine will all one day be done by robots, what a fantasy that is!), and so people aren't connected in their communities here in America, and don't have pride in their jobs if they are even employed at all.

Farming is kaput and fake food is the norm and the "disrupted" economy rejiggers everyone into job insecurity and the endless hustle. People aren't cobblers or seamstresses or furniture makers any more (by and large) and so while all these do-gooder agencies look to the rest of the poor globe to make coops and various B-Corp (socially responsible corporations) to make garments and other goods they rarely apply that same thinking to the hollowed out center of America.

Think of all those Trump country places where discontented whites, often on a swathe of social services as well as addicted to drugs and otherwise unhealthy in the extreme, could be rehabilitated by having a sewing cooperative or leather works or artisanal woodworking or just supplying their localities with better quality local food as farmers and businesspersons?

Ideas like that are scoffed at too readily as either the thinking of "elites" (artisan hipsters, that's so Brooklyn!), or as impractical in an age of just-in-time retail at a massive scale (think Wal Mart as the prevailing norm), or as the kind of approach suitable to Bangladesh or Morocco or Ethiopia etc., but mysteriously not applied here at home even as the gaping divide in wealth, empowerment, and dignity grows at an alarming rate, particularly in our former manufacturing areas and rural outposts.

usernamechris wrote:

The world appears so connected now, but it really isn't, otherwise we would do better.

In a minute I will not even feel particularly consciously troubled anymore by what is taking place around the big bend.

I really don't know how to use my social responsibility in an appropriate manner. Feels embarrassingly complacent, but come next Monday I'll be tied up in work again, and will tell myself, at least I'm in the public sector.

Again, I think it's a question of scale. When the "problem" appears too big we feel too small, and even a choice to "act locally" can make us feel insignificant and basically helpless.

As for me, I really don't "care" about the rest of the world right now because I feel like my responsibility is to make America a better place like with the examples I cited above and my work in systems thinking around energy, consumption, and waste.

Of course I do care about the world — I feel like I actively nurture a kind of agape and pray prayers of universal love and seat myself as a systems thinker, so I know it's all connected. But in a paradigm of distraction, as America certainly is and has been for most of my life, it's easy to shut down, opt out, and choose getting entertained to death over taking any small and seemingly insignificant action to effect real change.

Sadly what's happening MOST of all in the US in terms of what gets noticed ("and now they have an audience") is people being attracted to symbolic rather than substantive change.

Oh, they've got lots of reasons why they think this is actually the truly important work (must eliminate history from the public square because it "hurts people's feelings" that the people of the past didn't have the same degree of evolution as a small group of the people of the present do) and so will invest heart and soul trying to rid the world of symbolic injustices and shadows while not showing up for the truly impactful work in policy and legislation.

It's "sexy" to be outraged. You seem important and tuned in if you're writing the Twitter hashtag du jour in social justice, or railing in front of the courthouse with placards, or making art that shows the bad guys what bad guys they are. But in the end, while that may impart a feeling of empowerment it's not the same empowerment as changing laws at a fundamental level or even building a structure and serving it — like constructing homes for the homeless and then participating in either job training for them or providing palliative care if they are beyond the realm of being a productive member of society.

The real work is not sexy. The real work is largely boring with a splash every now and again.

Currently I am a bit cheered that I see a potential sea change in addressing things like plastic straws — an insidious element of modern American life that many go so far as to deem a necessity and even an entitlement. Restaurants even in my rural outpost appear to be addressing the truly criminal nature of this product in baby steps (from plastic to paper which, while not perfect, is a step in the semi-right direction). It makes me feel like perhaps we can truly awaken society to systems thinking which is the ultimate seat of all our problem solving — we must evolve to an awareness of our earthly limitations and hence an evolved stewardship of our world and our resources.

I cut the war part of your post only because I didn't have much to say there except that all wars are essentially resource wars. If we understand and healthfully manage our earth systems at least some measure of the worst of war could potentially be tamped down in spite of the fact that the worst element of humanity will likely always be with us in some form or another (likely, but not necessarily certainly).

usernamechris wrote:

"The Secret Life of the Mind", by Mariano Sigman, which sounds a bit tabloid, you know, with the word 'secret', when they actually mean 'unconscious', or 'invisible except by fMRI and some such imaging techniques',  a n d , turns out I am one of those people who are lucid dreamers, that's right, I dream lucid, and know so from having watched another internet program, this one on lucid dreaming. Apparently only some people realise that they are dreaming when they are dreaming, and that makes them lucid. Trust me, it's pretty cool. You maybe think, like I did, Oh wow, that's not bad, but there is more: further more I dream in colour. a n d  in DDD, or, for those less technically minded, in three D, a n d  in colour. There's also surround sound but that is probably standard now in most brains.

Me too, I dream all those ways too. I love it even though I sometimes have some terrifying encounters with devilish characters. In fact it blew my mind that Malkmus had that line, "You've got some demons on your breath," because I spoke that exact line to a very intense and erotic figure who appeared in my dreams last year, and I can assure you, I had never heard his song "Difficulties" at that point. 

The figure approached me and was somewhat, not entirely, but somewhat werewolf like, and he had claws and a huge pink dick and big pink tongue. I admit I was eroticized by him. I wanted to have sex with him in the dreamscape, I was very drawn in. But I said to him, "You have some demons on your breath." My purpose was to ask him to exorcize those and then perhaps we could have sex in a future dream. Hand to God that that is a true story, and I'm very into God so take this as a little gospel.

61 (edited by kate h 2018-07-14 06:50:03)

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

usernamechris wrote:

You mentioned systems thinking as the ultimate seat of all our problem solving, and I am under the impression that such thinking is currently not particularly often or extensively practiced by very many people, so now I wonder if you are aware of any kind of easily accessible text, you know maybe even to the degree of Hollywood film, where people are introduced to that type of thinking, at least to the extent that it's something easy for them to explore further. You know, for example in the way that "The Matrix" made the idea of cyperspace a run of the mill concept in popular culture.

I think the other thing that would help things move along would be a more widespread understanding of the way our brains generally work, so that we aren't so often misguided by certain misconceptions.

Good call, but no, I don't know of a film or a viral type very accessible book like that. It's weird that we have so much information so widely available to people and we're still not knitting together the big picture.

In America, you know, we know what we have to do to build and sustain a better world. It's not totally a lack of not knowing. A lot of it is about other things that get in the way — greed, prejudices, the lower angels of our human condition.

usernamechris wrote:

Anyways, yeah, not sure if I see that line "deamons on your breath" as super mega strange to have appeared to you about a year before Malkmus used it in "Let Them Eat Vowels", but only maybe as super strange, or maybe even a bit less than that, because it is one of so many lines that could have coincided with something from your dreams, but I actually don't really understand the mathematical probability of that.

Well, and he may well have already used it before I dreamt that. I thought I recalled that he said in an interview or two that this album was recorded last year. I'm not sure.

And you know, that response, "demons on your breath," could be something archetypal, widely used, or widely available in the non-physical dimensions, dreams, astral projection, out-of-body experiences, etc.

While I usually have lucid dreams, it doesn't mean that all my dreams are of the same nature — some are still more complex, or intense, or otherworldly than others. That particular dream was SO INTENSE that I've really never forgotten any of its details that I recalled when I awoke. That's why I recognized the phrase so immediately when I hear the song and also _in part_ why I find the song so erotic.

usernamechris wrote:

What I do know is that I appeared to have recognised somewhat similar matches on a few other occasions. For example, isn't there a line about moths having caused him the most trouble of any critter creature, or something like that? Well, when I dropped of a suit for dry cleaning earler in the week, I noticed that some moths had taken to it, and that's by far the most damage any animal creature other than humans have caused any of my stuff, with exception of Joe the cat, who has destroyed several things, but I don't really mind because I love him, whereas the moths I am only fascinated by.

I think that was one of his Twitter posts, about the moths.

I collect vintage camp blankets, old Pendletons and ones from smaller looms when I can find them. That's why I have a cedar-lined walk in closet. With about 20 of these blankets I need to store them free from fear of moths. I just use a cedar chest for sweater and wool shirt storage during the summer. So if you don't have a cedar chest, by all means, get one. Less offensive than mothballs and just as effective imho.

As for cats, of course they're fiercely independent, and often shy and skittish, but they're also quite loving. So what has Joe done to vex you?"

usernamechris wrote:

Okay, that wasn't necessarily the most convincing example of what I meant. H o w e v e r  , there is a lot more on the new record where at least for amoment I thought, Does he somehow know what I have been up to? Maybe a little bit more likely is that he is probably "just" a super aware writer who can turn things in phrases that are in some way meaningful even to me out here at the edge of the galaxy, er, I meant to say, on the other side of the globe and nowhere very particular on the other side of Alpha Centauri A and Alpha Centauri B then approximately on the way to Messier 31.

Yeah, he's such an intense artist (wrapped up in an easy going “slacker” appearance). I've always considered him to ride the psychic plane with deftness and channel that into his work. It's a beautiful thing.

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

Hey everyone. Miss you guys so I thought I'd drop in. Sux England only got fourth in the world soccer ball tournament. I was really rooting for them. I don't know a word of Croation (in contrast to my 5 whole years of Francais) but I'm rooting for those guys anyway.

Hope all is well. I'm still out in Seattle so if any of you come out hit me up. I work downtown and can show you around.

Equal parts vim and vigor

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

usernamechris wrote:

I've learned that swiping things off tables is good fun, it can really add to the moment. I do it at work sometimes, but I would advise to announce it first, or it might be frowned upon. One good variety of this sort of thinf is to swipe something off a table and to then look into the middle distance, as if to say, "Business as usual".


daz funneh...

people don't change...

64 (edited by kate h 2018-07-15 07:50:01)

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

usernamechris wrote:

Sorry Kate, Joe, he does not vex me at all, but he has destroyed some things in the past, such as
Joe likes to swipe things off surfaces so they fall onto the ground and because I know that I had placed the spinning thing where I thought he would not swipe it off, but he got there and did and it smashed the glass.

He also bit through some headphones chords, not even twenty-four hours from when I got them.

Young people sometimes ask me if I self-harm because my arms are scratched, but  that's just from Joe's claws.

None of those things are vexing me, because they are just part of the cat way.

He scratches mes ometimed because when he was little I let him bite and scratch me because he was too little to cause any damage and he enjoyed it. Now he's bigger and he doesn't usually do it, usually he jumps at me without his claws out, but sometimes he gets carried away, if I challange him he can be fierce, or he might scratch me when I pick him up and he does not want to be picked up and I understand if he sctatches me then.

He is actually very nice and generally gentle.

One good variety of this sort of thinf is to swipe something off a table and to then look into the middle distance, as if to say, "Business as usual".

An old familiar story, darlin’. I know because my cat Chester does the same thing with the same “business as usual” poker face as Joe.

I guess it’s cause they want our attention and if we don’t get what is meant by “meow” they have to up the ante by knocking stuff around. It’s the cat way of saying, “ You’re a big, important person and I’m just a little cat, will you please reach out and pick me up and hold me close?” Now in your case you might be wary that you’ll get scratched but it’s my sincere hope that you won’t. If I could talk to Joe I’d say , “no scratching!” in a firm but gentle voice that always worked with my kids.

But I will say that once recently I went away for a week and when I returned Chester was visibly angry with me. He grabbed at my arm and bit at me for several hours on and off. I must not have communicated very well that I needed to leave for a while. I can be klutzy like that on occasion. I hope that won’t happen again!

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

Lloyd wrote:

Hey everyone. Miss you guys so I thought I'd drop in. Sux England only got fourth in the world soccer ball tournament. I was really rooting for them. I don't know a word of Croation (in contrast to my 5 whole years of Francais) but I'm rooting for those guys anyway.

Hope all is well. I'm still out in Seattle so if any of you come out hit me up. I work downtown and can show you around.

Dude we were like ECSTATIC to be 4th.  The young fellas did great.

Bend over!
Hi Ben

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

Still quick

Not part of Trump admin

Laughing daily

Newest new
Millennial daughter's imminent departure for York, England
for four years
in pursuit of Masters in psychology
(sorry, Virginia, maybe PhD)

Proud papa

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

zengomi wrote:

Still quick

Not part of Trump admin

Laughing daily

Newest new
Millennial daughter's imminent departure for York, England
for four years
in pursuit of Masters in psychology
(sorry, Virginia, maybe PhD)

Proud papa

Very nice city - very medieval. very cool and gothic. Four years will be more than enough though :-)

Bend over!
Hi Ben

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

Yep, some family moved to York a few years ago so have been a few times recently, it's a lovely city, as Mani says, very medieval. Will you make the trip over zengo?

"Shnake!"

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-I-DYzr4Y46w/UxzQ4Ny6qEI/AAAAAAAAFQs/V6HhbL3nNdw/s1600/Ivanhoe+1982+James+Mason.JPG

"It´s a fine line between clever and..eh.. stupid"

70 (edited by perfectdepth 2018-09-23 04:18:04)

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

It's my birthday and my friends made me a card.

http://i.imgur.com/92hEZTy.jpg

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

perfectdepth wrote:

It's my birthday and my friends made me a card.

http://i.imgur.com/92hEZTy.jpg

Love!!! 

It's only been a few days, so I think I can still say Happy Birthday Week!

One Christmas my daughter gave me homemade "Dragonfly Pie" lotion (and it was really good, too!)

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

Get With The Realness!! wrote:

Yep, some family moved to York a few years ago so have been a few times recently, it's a lovely city, as Mani says, very medieval. Will you make the trip over zengo?

Happy Birthday, Realness!  Keep it up, man!

I did make the trip. Eight days there. Such genuinely friendly folk, amid sublime architecture. Daughter is equally, if not more so, enamored. We also ventured up to the North York Moors, where sheep graze freely. I'm contemplating stints in York.

To any who venture there, Maris the Otter is a brilliant York bitter.

I'll leave off with....

http://www.zengomi.com/photos/Decisions.jpg

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

Jicky wrote:
perfectdepth wrote:

It's my birthday and my friends made me a card.

http://i.imgur.com/92hEZTy.jpg

Love!!! 

It's only been a few days, so I think I can still say Happy Birthday Week!

One Christmas my daughter gave me homemade "Dragonfly Pie" lotion (and it was really good, too!)

Thanks Jicky! Dragonfly Pie is a great name for a lotion and I think would keep other people from using all of it.

74 (edited by solemn avalanche 2018-10-05 15:28:43)

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/o3yUA_TQ_xhji6WlN2vAUb43n10Z5mkci8CgKHOr8Dp1A5cwMU45T6g8UPhZ6wiU4tmH1MIbyQXk5kHXro6HautfXBPDms53LuRgBHBcssX9-OgZoLNNLWU9Vs60FQ-EdHoTSKF8wQ=w2400

We got ourselves a new best friend. Her name is Malky. She shreds (dehydrated bull penises) like a goddess of yore.

Couldn't imagine life without her. Happy that my spouse shares similar musical interests with me enough to christen her so.