Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

Aww man, sorry Kate!  Animals are family, without any doubt.  Our cat is 19 and doing well, but every time I look at her, I already feel a tinge of sadness knowing we probably won't have her for much longer.  So sorry about Chester.

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

Particlenoun wrote:

Aww man, sorry Kate!  Animals are family, without any doubt.  Our cat is 19 and doing well, but every time I look at her, I already feel a tinge of sadness knowing we probably won't have her for much longer.  So sorry about Chester.

Aw, that’s so kind. It was really intense to watch his out-of-seeming-nowhere rapid decline and then his last day and night. We didn’t go to the vet because he didn’t show overt signs of pain or suffering so his death was at home. He had one final heave of life and pulled himself out of this basket I had him in and went under the couch I was on and then died just beneath me.

My kids have grown and the house is empty and so since then when I come home and there’s no Chester I get a fresh sense that he’s gone. I’m still crying a lot!

But my hubby Erik was super awesome in the process (as always) and took care of everything and cremated him for hours and offered amazing prayers and other meaningful reflection and support so it’s at least been a very real and profound experience. Death.

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

kate h wrote:

My cat of 18 years, Chester, he died last week. "Pet Politics" is right, you never know. It's made me very sad, I miss the old boy a lot, every day.

((((((kateh)))))))

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

kate h wrote:

My cat of 18 years, Chester, he died last week. "Pet Politics" is right, you never know. It's made me very sad, I miss the old boy a lot, every day.

That's terrible to hear, Kate. Awfully sorry. Good vibes to you. I lost one last year and I struggled for weeks. Go easy on yourself.

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

Y’all are too kind! ❤️

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

I think it was Jimmer who said that pet grief is as deep as person grief. It just fades faster. And I experienced it kinda that way myself...it was really rough. I feel for you kate...

"It´s a fine line between clever and..eh.. stupid"

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

Good advice, all. Chester's in kitty heaven and ghosting about from time to time.

I did something I like. Wrote an essay on the Virginia mess: https://tinyurl.com/ybt28mk5

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

kate h wrote:

Good advice, all. Chester's in kitty heaven and ghosting about from time to time.

I did something I like. Wrote an essay on the Virginia mess: https://tinyurl.com/ybt28mk5

Thanks for sharing, it is good to hear the opinion of an actual Virginian and Northam voter. I agree with the way you look at the bigger picture. I think that, unfortunately, Northam has brutally failed the aftermath in which he could've made an argument similar to yours. Maybe it isn't for me to say, since he is not my governor, but at this point, it feels like Northam needs to go.

Since you have always made this clear on the Jixboard, and make mention of it in the post you linked, I'm curious what you are thinking about the Green New Deal?

I understand the neoliberal argument that it lacks concrete mechanisms and implementation details, but I'm also a big fan of the truth that a big vision is required here, a vision that matches the true scale and urgency of the problem, since the lack of urgency in the public conversation to this point is the reason the problem is so severe now, and the reactions to it will have to be so significant as a result.

I have no illusion that the GND passes. It won't. But I would argue that the goal of it wasn't, couldn't have, and shouldn't have been to pass. Even passing weak tea "market based solutions" wasn't going anywhere. The goal is to fundamentally change the conversation from those "market based solutions" to the reality that the solutions required cannot wait for the invisible hand to wave itself in the right direction, and that on top of it, we can only build the political will required to solve the problem by couching it in broadly shared public programs that seek to fix additional systemic problems.

And I have to say, for any legitimate foibles of the bill's text, or the FAQ that was released, etc., it seems abundantly clear that the bill has already achieved a moderate degree of success in changing the terms of the conversation to a more proper footing. (Which, I know, sells short the efforts of the Sunrise Movement, or Greta Thunberg, or other literal kids that are taking this seriously and getting in the streets to get the issue the attention it deserves. So props to them!)

- Nathan

84 (edited by kate h 2019-02-12 11:15:41)

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

nguideau wrote:
kate h wrote:

Good advice, all. Chester's in kitty heaven and ghosting about from time to time.

I did something I like. Wrote an essay on the Virginia mess: https://tinyurl.com/ybt28mk5

Thanks for sharing, it is good to hear the opinion of an actual Virginian and Northam voter. I agree with the way you look at the bigger picture. I think that, unfortunately, Northam has brutally failed the aftermath in which he could've made an argument similar to yours. Maybe it isn't for me to say, since he is not my governor, but at this point, it feels like Northam needs to go.

Since you have always made this clear on the Jixboard, and make mention of it in the post you linked, I'm curious what you are thinking about the Green New Deal?

I understand the neoliberal argument that it lacks concrete mechanisms and implementation details, but I'm also a big fan of the truth that a big vision is required here, a vision that matches the true scale and urgency of the problem, since the lack of urgency in the public conversation to this point is the reason the problem is so severe now, and the reactions to it will have to be so significant as a result.

I have no illusion that the GND passes. It won't. But I would argue that the goal of it wasn't, couldn't have, and shouldn't have been to pass. Even passing weak tea "market based solutions" wasn't going anywhere. The goal is to fundamentally change the conversation from those "market based solutions" to the reality that the solutions required cannot wait for the invisible hand to wave itself in the right direction, and that on top of it, we can only build the political will required to solve the problem by couching it in broadly shared public programs that seek to fix additional systemic problems.

And I have to say, for any legitimate foibles of the bill's text, or the FAQ that was released, etc., it seems abundantly clear that the bill has already achieved a moderate degree of success in changing the terms of the conversation to a more proper footing. (Which, I know, sells short the efforts of the Sunrise Movement, or Greta Thunberg, or other literal kids that are taking this seriously and getting in the streets to get the issue the attention it deserves. So props to them!)

So as to Northam seeming like he should step down --- it's a punishment that wouldn't fit the "crime." It's all this unresolved American material, stretching back to the founding, compounded during the Civil War and Civil Rights-- no one man can account for that, or is responsible for it.

Sure, he was ham-handed in handling it, but, hey, he's no Drumpf! Democracy would be subverted if he resigned, putting a Republican in in what was a Democratic sweep in the last state election. Two wrongs definitely won't make a right, here.

Anyway, we really have to get off of symbolism --- statues, and old photos, and past people, and words, and bike lanes -- and start dealing with the only thing that's going to undo racism in the US: racist policies that act to continue enslaving blacks (prison and "justice system"), unequal municipal distributions to schools and in medical access, racial profiling, voting intimidation, environmental injustice with brownfields and less access to clean energy and infrastructure, ahem, things like bike lanes, etc.

Identity politics is the biggest hoodwink of our time. What matters is policies, not policing of language and attitudes.

On the Green New Deal, I'd have to say I'm woefully under-informed about its specifics at this time. I don't read a lot of news anymore -- I'm too fragile for it.

But from an intuitive perspective I'd say that it reads as right on, overdue really. It's premature to spat over the specifics. Instead you're correct that it's vision and unity that's needed.

I've learned the hard way through my husband's career in politics and his work as a solar executive trying to change restrictive solar policy in Virginia, that it's true:  if the people would lead the leaders would follow.

Sadly there's so much done to subvert democracy and far too much emphasis placed on the presidential contest and voting in general. In truth, lobbying is far more important and far more effective. And that's not just for guys in Gucci loafers, it's for every(wo)man. That's what Americans should be doing.

On the left an overemphasis on identity politics seeks validation for being, with an effort to align fairness in laws tangential at best. It becomes a bawdy parade of narcissism rather than a honed and strategic and disciplined team seeking doable, tangible, policy specifics.

As I always say, there's no one to love on a dead planet, no gender to opt in or out of on a dead planet, no education to get or doctor to see on a dead planet, no wages to earn or enlightenment to realize or education to achieve on a dead planet, no new options for women on a dead planet, no healthier food to eat for children on a dead planet, no "races" or ethnicities to take pride in or spar over on a dead planet.

Our issues are structural, technocratic to some degree. We're playing on the surface, ever in thrall to Trumpian-like communication modalities, and mudslinging as entertainment, while our big issues go unaddressed. It's like that channeled voice said to me in my bedroom when I was fifteen, speaking through my voice about our environmental and energy predicament: "I await the maturation of the human race." Heavy stuff.

So there's no question we need a Green New Deal, whatever it looks like from its inspiration to its highly technical particulars. It needs to be war footing level. Its an obvious boon for jobs and the economy and climate mitigation and, I believe, for the feeling of humanity, or Americans rather, having a worthy purpose in our time. It's something far more likely than anything else to "Make America Great Again."

The 2020 Prez cycle is so much sideshow and nonsense. The thing to do is to forget coalescing early around some candidate because all could be analyzed over potentials and flaws. The thing to do is to find that vision, hold tight to that vision, subsume ALL OTHER ISSUES AND PERSPECTIVES AND NEEDS under that rubric, and stay single issue, single issue, single issue (allowing those other issues as a sub-part of that overarching picture), and to that end, yes, a Green New Deal is the only real way forward, demanding that anyone who gets the Democratic nod must be on board with some form of the Green New Deal.

I'll read up on its specifics at some point to provide more grounded analysis. IN the meantime, a big fat kiss for VISION. Yes, truly transforming to a clean energy, smart development, low carbon impact, re-use, cradle-to-cradle paradigm, go local ag, and other things green vision is both essential and realizable. I have faith.

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

Thanks for the reply! I agree with the main points of your post and appreciate the thoughtfulness!

The one thing I differ on is that my gut feelings can't dismiss identity politics and symbolism in the same way. But to be quite honest, I don't have much more to say on that because I don't know that it's my place to. I'm a white guy in America. I don't have any representation issues, I don't have symbols of oppression against people like me swirling around my city. The whole game is designed to go my way.

- Nathan

Re: hey, what's new with everybody?

nguideau wrote:

Thanks for the reply! I agree with the main points of your post and appreciate the thoughtfulness!

The one thing I differ on is that my gut feelings can't dismiss identity politics and symbolism in the same way. But to be quite honest, I don't have much more to say on that because I don't know that it's my place to. I'm a white guy in America. I don't have any representation issues, I don't have symbols of oppression against people like me swirling around my city. The whole game is designed to go my way.

On the debate over statues in Virginia, fewer than 50% of blacks wanted them down. On Northam's resignation, 58% of blacks didn't think he should resign when polled, cited in the Washington Post.

As to symbols, yes, they're rough, and we can only imagine what they mean to others, though they mean something to me too that wouldn't be captured if only one group's "feelings" were taken into account. I quote not to mock, but to suggest the shifting nature, emphemerality, multiplicity, of feelings, perspectives. Mediators might help there in a public dialog.

But it's like some Taoist chapter or verse. "Take the fruit, forsake the flower."

White men who earnestly wish to make a difference on the justice and fairness and equality of all citizens, and particularly in respect to any demonstrable racial injustices in law, or their local laws or local practices, should lobby. Lobby! Lobby your local elected officials, school board, council, supervisors, elders, I don't know what else, but local, and lobby. Talk to them. Air your concerns and point to repairs.

If the bad policies are serious and egregious and no action is taken, reach out for more voices and join and participate, in process more than necessarily protest. Take more to lobby.

Lobby.

Non-joiners could pen letters to the editor. Raise voices. But sensibly. We have to start to do it sensibly.